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MRR Radio #1587 • 12/10/17

This week Matt pulls some rarities out of the vault to make the scums and punks drool. Intro song: STENGTE DØRER ...

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ATTENTAT!

MRR Radio #1586 • 12/3/17

On this week's MRR Radio, Rob goes ballistic for late '70s and early '80s Bloodstains punk rock from around the ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #416 • Jan 2018

Another new year, another exciting issue of Maximum Rocknroll! MRR #416, our January 2018 issue, begins with a sad note as we ...

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"Who gives a fuck?"

MRR Radio #1585 • 11/26/17

“[...] Elvis gives them a short speech about the death pangs that humanity must go through in order to reach ...

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MRR Radio #1584 • 11/19/17

Another fuct up Rotten Ron and Horrrible Halitosis Punker Power Hour. Intro song: DRUGCHARGE - Husk Rotten Ron fucks it up so you ...

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Top Tens from MRR #337 • June 2011


June 3rd, 2011 by

Hi kids! Every month, a couple weeks after the magazine comes out, we post our reviewers’ monthly top tens from the latest issue of Maximum Rocknroll. This one’s from MRR #337, the June 2011 issue. Dig in!

Mariam Bastani

Mariam Bastani
MAXIMO VOLUMEN-Inyecciones Por El Bul-LP
MEN’S INTEREST-More War-EP
MANIPULATION-Subversive Intent-EP
GOBIERNO MILITAR-Destino-EP
HIMEI-EP / SILLA ELÉCTRICA-Ritmo Suicida-LP
BON BAD/DURESS-split EP
GIUDA-45 / POISON PLANET-EP
RATOS DE PORÃO/COLERA-split LP
ILEGAL-La Vida es el Producto de Nuestra Esperanza y las Visiones Irreales-EP
BELLICOSE MINDS-EP / MUGWORT-live

Brace Belden

Brace Belden
THE BUZZ-Insanity-EP
TELECOMMANDE-Panique Devant L’écran/Pixels-45
BLACK MARKET BABY-Potential Suicide-EP
TIMMY’S ORGANISM-Can and Bottle Return, Smile-EP
UV RACE-Homo-LP
THE USERS-Kicks in Style-LP
GIUDA-Get It Over/Kidz Are Back-45
DOW JONES AND THE INDUSTRIALS-Can’t Stand the Midwest-EP
SCHOOL JERKS-Screamer-EP
BÄDDAT FÖR TRUBBEL-Det Här Är Inte New York-LP

Tim Brooks
FY FAN-Ingen Framtid For Alltid-EP
HIGH TENSION WIRES-Welcome New Machine-LP
SILLA ELÉCTRICA-Ritmo Suicida-LP
BÄDDAT FÖR TRUBBEL-Det Här Är Inte New York-LP
UV RACE-Homo-LP
LIQUID STONE-Here Comes The Weekend-45
D-CLONE / NERVESKADE-split EP
NIGHT BIRDS-Midnight Movies-EP
GIUDA-Get It Over/Kidz Are Back-45
SHARDS-LP

Robert Collins

Robert Collins
On the Road Again / Willie Nelson Rides Again

Dougie!

Sean “Dougie” Dougan
COSMONAUTS-LP
TV GHOST-Mass Dream-LP
SILLA ELÉCTRICA-Ritmo Suicida-LP
HIGH TENSION WIRES-Welcome New Machine-LP
UV RACE-Homo-LP
THE USERS-Kicks in Style-LP
DOW JONES AND THE INDUSRIALS-EP
LIQUID STONE-Here Comes The Weekend-45
NIGHT BIRDS-Midnight Movies-EP
SHARP OBJECTS-CD

Layla G

Layla Gibbon
HOMOSTUPIDS-Strawberry Orange Peach Banana-LP
SILLA ELÉCTRICA-Ritmo Suicida-LP
HIMEI-EP
TIMMY’S ORGANISM-Can and Bottle Return, Smile-EP
TELECOMMANDE-45 / UV RACE-Homo-LP
BRAINWAVES-Can’t Take It-EP
BROKEN WATER-Peripheral Star-LP
MEN’S INTEREST-More War-EP
BLEACHED-45 / HEADCOATEES/HEADCOATS-split LP
WHITE LOAD-EP / MANIPULATION-Subversive Intent-EP

Dan Goetz

Dan Goetz
HEART ATTACK-Toxic Lullabies: 1980-‘84-LP / DOW JONES AND THE INDUSTRIALS-Can’t Stand the Midwest-EP
MUCH WORSE-Absolute Nightmare-EP
ANIMAL EYE/GREEN SCREEN DOOR-split cassette
BORN BAD-Total Bullshit-EP
BORN BAD/DURESS-split EP
ILEGAL-La Vida es el Producto de Nuestra Esperanza y las Visiones Irreales-EP
DEATH FIRST-Trapped-EP / STRIPMINES-EP
BROKEN WATER-LP / BRAINWAVES–EP
COKE BUST-EP / MEN’S INTEREST-EP
NIGHT BIRDS-EP / FY FAN-Ingen Framtid For Alltid-EP

Bob Goldie (circa 1986)

Bob Goldie
THE OOPS-Taste of Zimbabwe-LP
LIQUID STONE-Here Comes the Weekend-45
PEOPLE’S TEMPLE-Sons of Stone
CROSS RAGE-EP / NO PROBLEM-EP
SWEET TOOTH-Japanese Void-EP
SLOBS-Look Busy Do Nothing-EP
SORRY EXCUSE-Listen With Prejudice-EP
COKE BUST-Degradation-EP
USERS-Kicks in Style-LP
ВРЕДИТЕЛИ-Hardcore 2010-EP

Kenny Kaos
CHERRY BOMBERS/SPACE FUZZ-split EP
TRENT FOX AND THE TENANTS-Mess Around-EP
THE USERS-Kicks in Style-LP
THE STEAKNIVES-Devil Inside-LP
GIUDA-Get It Over/Kidz Are Back-45
BOTOX RATS/MODERN ACTON-split EP
MOONDOGS-Heads I Win/Two’s a Crowd-45
SCHOOL JERKS-Screamer-EP
BRAINWAVES-Can’t Take It-EP
BOOZE/BITERS/MEAN JEANS/DAVILA 666-live

Carolyn Keddy
TIMMY’S ORGANISM-Can and Bottle Return, Smile-EP
TWO TEARS-Eat People-EP
UV RACE-Homo-LP
BRAINWAVES-Can’t Take It-EP
THE STEAKNIVES-Devil Inside-LP
TV GHOST-Mass Dream-LP / PREDATOR-LP
BUTCHER COVER-EP / APACHE DROPOUT-LP
THE USERS-Kicks in Style-LP
DOW JONES AND THE INDUSTRIALS-EP
THE BUZZ-Insanity-EP / LIQUID STONE-45

Ray Lujan
THE COATHANGERS-Larceny-CD
CUTE LEPERS-Adventure Time-CD
MIXTAPES-A Short Collection-EP
NO PROBLEM-Paranoid Times-EP
ONE WIN CHOICE-Conveyor-CD
THE PART FIVE-CD / RUN, FOREVER-CD
SHARP OBJECTS-CD / STEAKNIVES-LP
TRENT FOX AND THE TENANTS-Mess Around-EP
UV RACE-Homo-LP
THE GEARS-live / CUTE LEPERS-live

Marissa Magic
SISSY SPACEK-Vanishing Point-EP
HYSTERICS-cassette
SHEARING PINX-live
WHITE LOAD-…Plays Fuck Jams-EP
V/A-Bloodstains Across British Columbia-EP
BROKEN WATER-Peripheral Star-LP
RAYMILLAND-Recordings ’79-’81-LP
HOMOSTUPIDS-Strawberry Orange Peach Banana-LP
D-CLONE/NERVESKADE-split EP
BORN BAD-Total Bullshit-EP

Ken Sanderson
Too many things are too extreme
There’s too much shit, too many schemes
It never makes sense, it’s just a hype
Forget about it, live your own life

Fred Schrunk

Fred Schrunk
SILLA ELÉCTRICA-Ritmo Suicida-LP
FROZEN TEENS/STREET LEGAL-split EP
DEATH FIRST-Trapped-EP
HIMEI-EP
BROKEN WATER-Peripheral Star-LP
TELECOMMANDE-Panique Devant L’écran/Pixels-45
BÄDDAT FÖR TRUBBEL-Det Här Är Inte New York-LP
BRAINWAVES-Can’t Take It-EP
BURNING ITCH-Me Myself and I-EP
TIMMY’S ORGANISM-Can and Bottle Return, Smile-EP

Martin Sorrondeguy(!)

Martin Sorrondeguy
ILEGAL-La Vida es el Producto de Nuestra Esperanza y las Visiones Irreales-EP
POISON PLANET-EP / MEN’S INTEREST-EP
BORN BAD-EP
BORN BAD/DURESS-split EP
SORRY EXCUSE-EP / COKE BUST-EP
CROSS RAGE-Cross Rage-EP
D-CLONE/NERVESKADE-split EP
FY FAN-Ingen Framtid For Alltid-EP
STRIPMINES-Sympathy Rations-EP
MUCH WORSE-Absolute Nightmare-EP

Top Ten Zines
Distort #32
Accept the Darkness #5
Habitat #2
Mosh #13
Negative Guestlist #19, #20, #21
Ala Intensidaz #7
Feedback #9
Drunk Nach Osten #2
Full Metal Faggot #4
Ratcharge #23
Middle Finger Response #3



Politics and Punk in Hawaii: Steve Hart talks with Keli’i Beyer


June 2nd, 2011 by

I first met Keli’i Beyer when my band flew to Oahu for a weekend of shows. He welcomed me, along with his roommates, into his home. I was struck by his intellect and passion towards Hawai’i. We spent a couple afternoons arguing and passionately debating ideas and we’ve become friends since then. When I was reminded that I should contribute some things to MRR’s website, I thought of Keli’i, and this is the conversation that took place over a few days.

—Steve Hart

Keli'i Beyer getting arrested in NYC

MRR: I know that you have been involved in a lot of different groups — especially working with domestic violence. How did you get involved with that and when did you start?

Keli’i: I’ve been a domestic violence educator now for about six years, working with the Domestic Violence Action Center here in Honolulu. My job is to talk with intermediate, high school, and sometimes college, students about the aspects of violent relationships, and how to help friends/family stay safe or get out of these dangerous situations. Initially, through my work with various community activism (i.e., anti-war protests, environmental issues, human rights campaigns, Cultural Native Hawaiian activism, promotion of gay/LGBT rights, as well as the issue of pro-choice and women’s reproductive rights), I was introduced to the appropriate networks and landed a job as an educator in the DV field (domestic violence). I try to use my experiences working with community organizations and activism as a way to connect the various issues of oppression evident here in Hawaii, and connect the dots about why these issues occur in the first place. This includes, but is not limited to, the overt militarism and history of land stewardship in Hawaii; having an economy that relies solely on tourism and the military (and how that keeps us reliant on the US for resources, food and energy, rather than a “homegrown,” sustainable and uniquely cultural approach); the sense of heightened nationalism post-9/11 (and how this influences our attitude towards American interaction with the rest of the world), and importantly, understanding how the collective cultures here in Hawaii can affect our relationships with one another, especially around ideas of race, gender, and overall identity…

MRR: Did you go to school (college) in order to do this?

Keli’i: I was actually raised in Chicago, and moved to Hawaii in 1998 to attend the University of Hawaii (and because this is the only place i ever wanted to live, even growing up). I always knew that I’d like to study art in college, but really had no idea what I would do with it. Since both my parents are teachers, I always kinda figured I’d end up doing something similar, though really had no idea until I graduated from UH in 2005 and got my job at the Domestic Violence Action Center (at which point I had already been working as an art educator with the Honolulu Academy of Arts, so that was putting my art education background to use). I think being educated in a creative field such as art has given me the mentality that it’s more important to gain awareness and experience through life, than to seek making a quick buck at the expense of those around me (including my friends and family, the larger community, and globally, through limiting the detrimental impact I might have on the planet).

MRR: How has being kanaka (Native Hawaiian) affected you growing up here and what advice would you give young kids who are kanaka and have a hard time struggling with identity?

Keli’i: I am a part Hawaiian, and have always identified more with my Hawaiian heritage growing up (since my dad was a proud Hawaiian, and my mom died when I was a little kid, therefore cutting off most ties to that side of my family). Living on the mainland and feeling really connected to the island culture is hard, as there’s not only a physical disconnect living way in the Midwest, but there’s also a major cultural disconnect as well. It’s really difficult being a kid who’s interested in Hawaiian cultural identity, being surrounded by a society that simply views Hawaii as that “magical tourist destination,” where all Hawaiians live in grass huts on the beach, husk coconuts for a living, and surf and do hula all day long (even more annoying when I hear that from tourists coming here for the first time, expecting all locals to cater to their beck and command). It was important to have this identity, but also discomforting to move to Hawaii and realize how little I actually knew about my heritage. As well, it was kinda sad to see how kids here in the islands take for granted what a truly special and unique culture they have here. I was also really surprised how little the majority of “locals” actually knew about their host culture, the Kanaka Maoli. If anything, there seems to be this idea that if you live in Hawaii, then you’re a Hawaiian. Whenever I hear that type of mentality, it always makes me cringe, for it’s almost like saying a whole group of people that lived here for centuries matter very little in the larger scheme of things (even though, ironically, these indigenous “Hawaiians” got to these islands through a series of Polynesian and Micronesian migrations over a couple thousand years).

It’s definitely helped me understand more about my role as an activist and educator, to see what struggles face our people, and where the majority of these troubles are coming from. But it’s dually important that I can educate others about the history of the Hawaiian Islands, and how that history continues to affect us today (through economics, religious disparity, loss of culture and the struggle to regain access to the past; drugs/alcohol/crime/poverty/homelessness, land issues, and a whole slew of other issues). Any advice I have for fellow Hawaiians is to understand more about where we came from, so we can begin the healing process, move forward and grow from the mistakes and lessons the past has taught us. I absolutely love the fact that spoken Hawaiian language has seen a resurgence, and I would definitely advocate that more Kanaka Maoli take part in learning and teaching their language, as well as the other aspects of Hawaiian culture that will help us move ahead.

For me, a lot of this has come from taking part biannually in a religious ceremony called makahiki, which I attend on the island of Kaho’olawe. For those that don’t know, this is a small island that was used by the US military as a bombing range for over 60 years. In ancient times, this island was seen as the center of the Hawaiian island chain, and was the most important place for young Hawaiians to learn about navigation and the celestial “map” they used to guide their travels throughout the Pacific. To see an island as culturally significant as Kaho’olawe relegated to target practice by an institution like the US military is a constant source of pain for me (and many other Hawaiians), and I utilize this pain as a source of inspiration to maintain diligence in my pursuit to teach others about our struggle, and as a source of hope for the future. To continue the healing process that has begun on Kaho’olawe and elsewhere throughout Hawaii, there is much work still to be done.

MRR: It’s important to me that people hear the truth from the kanaka and it’s very rare that this is told in punk rock circles. A follow up question, do you think that it’s hard to be kanaka and be involved in punk rock? Do you get shit from the other side of that? Do you see a connection between the Hawaiian sovereignty movement and punk rock anarcho-type politics?

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