Featured Posts
AQUARIUM by Martin Sorrondeguy

MRR Radio #1579 • 10/15/17

Strace and Strayla vote MITCH CARDWELL for President of Punk.  Intro song: AQUARIUM - Human Current Sounds from the New Bins MR. WRONG - ...

Read More

Secreto Público

MRR Radio #1578 • 10/8/17

Matt is joined by Ben and Claudia for just another hour of the best new punk and hardcore worldwide! Intro ...

Read More

Maximum Rocknroll #414 • Nov 2017

Are y'all ready for Maximum Rocknroll #414? Our November 2017 issue will teach you a thing or two all about ...

Read More

Flipper rules, OK?

MRR Radio #1577 • 10/1/17

Phillip Greenlief spent an afternoon in the stacks. This is what he came up with. BAD RELIGION - You Are the ...

Read More

Jackal (photo by Zack Rogers)

New Blood! ESCØRT, WITCHTRIAL, JACKAL, VANTA, and UNIVERSAL PEACE

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info on how to submit. Now, ...

Read More

Maximum Rocknroll #390 • Nov 2015

mrr_390_cvrIt’s time for Maximum Rocknroll #390, the November 2015 issue! On our cover: AS MERCENÁRIAS, DIY post-punk legends from Brazil whose revelatory 1983 demo was just reissued on Nada Nada Discos. This issue also includes two conversations spanning the punk festival circuit: Not Dead Yet organizer Greg Benedetto sheds light on the motivations behind punk promotion, the ethical challenges of a growing fest, and a perfect day in Toronto; further south, organizers and performers alike pitch in on a brief oral history of Chattanooga’s Do Ya Hear We fest. Even more interviews in these pages, direct from the source: famously prolific MPC-augmented Ohio punks OBNOX; revolutionary Oakland noise voyagers SBSM; the dark and entrancing STRANGLED out of Edmonton; severe and austere Chicago post-punkers POPULATION; the raw noisy hardcore pandrogynous agenda of Portland’s EMASCULATOR; and last but not least, our first-ever interview with PARASITES in their nearly 30-year history spanning New Jersey and the Bay Area. As if that weren’t enough for you, we’ve also packed in photo spreads from the opening weekend of DIY Space for London and, from the dead center of the midwestern freak beat underground, Springfield, IL’s Dumb Fest 3D. All of this, the columns you love to loathe, and the most extensive reviews section in the wide world of punk print.

Buy MRR Back Issues

You can now download this issue of MRR for only $2.99!!
MRR_DL_this_issue



Reissue of the Week: Disclose


September 30th, 2015 by

DISCLOSE – “Yesterday’s Fairytale, Tomorrow’s Nightmare” LP
This is a monumental record, even without considering its place as the final DISCLOSE LP released before Kawakami’s passing in 2007. His death casts an enduring pall, particularly evident here in the new liner notes from Stuart Schrader. While Schrader primarily writes about the ill-fated DISCLOSE / FRAMTID tour, it is a far more insightful, nuanced and touching read than that might seem. Neither romantic nor cynical, the tone is simply reflective and personal: here are his perceptions of Kawakami’s experience in the US, not a verdict but a single opinion. The epilogue of the story, over a decade later, remains ambivalent. Kawakami, despite his legacy, was still a human being irreducible to the mythos that lives on after him. The continued care and commitment shown by those that knew him and called him “friend” are a welcome palliative, showing a more grounded context to the DISCLOSE legend. In that respect, the royalties from this reissue are going to Kawakami’s mother. Of course, for the vast majority of listeners, as Schrader is mindful to point out, the context is far less immediately relevant than the record itself. For those who ignore or simplify DISCLOSE as just some DISCHARGE-worship: you are missing the forest for the trees because these trees look like some other damn trees you saw in a different fucking forest. It’s just not that simple, and especially not with this record. Schrader’s track-by-track notes are much more compelling and attentive than anything I can comparably muster, so I won’t attempt too much here. Yesterday’s Fairytale is the pinnacle of “Disbones”-era DISCLOSE: fuzzed-out D-beat with increasingly more metallic influence in the guitar riffs. Without forsaking any of the raw energy, this style set loose the true hypnotic potential of the unrelenting beat that found its logical conclusion in the closing track “Wardead,” a nearly ten-minute opus of swirling chaos and perpetual solos; a psychedelic disengagement with time, a sonic inertial assault that is simultaneously as stupefying as it is doggedly transcendent. Noise, not music. Best listened to with a foggy brain. RIP Kawakami, Kawakami forever. (Shit Zoo)
(La Vida Es Un Mus)

 



MRR Radio #1472 • 9/27/15


September 27th, 2015 by

Dan digs through the new bin once again, and guest DJ Liz revisits the last week of fun shows she saw at Silent Barn in NYC.

Just as this show was about to be recorded, we got word that there had been a fire at the Silent Barn. No one was hurt, and the building is insured, but residents who lost their belongings could use some immediate help. If you are able, please consider making a donation at silentbarn.org/donate.

Play
Cochina

Cochina

Intro song:
NOXIOUS FUMES – Commencement Bay

Liz: bands that played Silent Barn this week
COLD BEAT – Clouds
HEAVEN’S GATE – Amanda Berry
COCHINA – Complejo de Salvador Blanco
AYE NAKO – Leaving the Body
G.L.O.S.S. – Outcast Stomp
FLEABITE – Missing Everyone

First New
FREAK VIBE – Cuss Gang
VAASKA – Mierda Systema
CONEHEADS – Out of Conetrol/Notha Thang
BLAZING EYE – Kill You
NO PROBLEM – Never See the Sun

Philly demos and one that isn’t
YDI – Out For Blood
FUCK SS – Condumb
CHONDRIA – 1000 Yards
DISMALT – Coach Blake

Second New
THE REPOSSESSED – Never Good Enough
HARD STRIPES – Laughter
FLESH WORLD – Just To Tear Me Down
SHITTY FRIENDS – Crime Line
SEXFACE – Gotta Survive

Third New
IVY – Cave Business
CRACKED COP SKULLS – Where Will It End?
FLIPOUT AA – Peace

Outro song:
PERMANENT RUIN – Titan

Maximum Rocknroll Radio is a weekly radio show and podcast featuring DIY punk, garage rock, hardcore, and more from around the world. Our rotating cast of DJs picks the best of the best from MRR magazine’s astounding, ever-growing vinyl archive. You can find MRR Radio archives, specials, and more at radio.maximumrocknroll.com. Thanks for listening!



Read a Book! A Wailing of a Town


September 25th, 2015 by

A Wailing Of A Town: An Oral History of Early San Pedro Punk and More
Craig Ibarra
344 pgs • $20
End Fwy Press
endfwypress.bigcartel.com

Yet another punk related oral history. Can the collective punk bookshelves take another addition to the seeming endless array of “I was there” sprawl? Has punk overtaken the hippie nostalgia frenzy? The answer to both of those questions is yes! I would put this book up with Lexicon Devil, another oral history about SoCal punk, as one of the best encapsulations of the mechanics, dysfunctions and excitements of a punk scene I have read. A Wailing of a Town shows the other side of the coin. The kids who didn’t run away to Hollywood, but rather stayed in their working class Southern California harbor town and made their own music and constructed their own idea of punk and community out of what they had. Lexicon Devil was ostensibly a biography of Darby Crash, but it somehow felt more like Crash was the fulcrum for a sprawling documentary report on the growth, power and dysfunctions of LA punk. This book is an oral history of San Pedro punk, and D. Boon, the city’s favorite son, ends up being the heart and soul of the narrative. Where previously published punk oral histories have put across the hip/cool actions of the cognoscenti (Please Kill MeWe Got the Neutron Bomb, etc.), this one really communicates the true inspiring and powerful force that is getting caught up in underground DIY and making something on your own terms.

While I was reading this someone asked me if it was “a Minutemen bio”—since clearly nothing else of note happened in Pedro punk in this person’s mind! One of the cooler aspects of the book is that while the Minutemen rightfully get a huge chunk of the chapters devoted to their sound and ideas, the other people who shaped a scene are given as much weight, from supportive non-musical punkers who were there to witness events or took on the background shitwork through to the wild performance artists. You really get a sense of how the San Pedro take on punk emerged from the town and how it was shaped by the different economic and geographic realities. The different voices and perspectives in the book—the macho nihilistic surf jocks, the feminist working class women of color—all give this work a true feeling of representation, and make it a fun and wild read.

The fact that the Minutemen were one of the guiding forces of the Pedro punks meant that people looked at them as examples, and as a result started their own weird bands and made their own record labels that only put out their friends’ weird and/or generic bands. It was a constructive and encouraging scene, despite endless harassment from cops and jocks and angry anti-punk locals. The feeling that you get from listening to the Minutemen, the rough and tumble warmth in with the cold hard truth, really reflects the scene that they came up through and helped invent. On the evidence of this book, the creative, expressive and radical power embodied by their sound, from the crazed inventive music through to the impassioned lyrics, the needs of the working class and the power of Coltrane are endorsed with equal authority, shaped the San Pedro punk idea as one quite distinct from other Southern Californian scenes. Speaking of which, the chapters on Saccharine Trust are easily worth the price of admission. Paganicons is one of the wildest and most interesting LPs SST ever released, and despite the fact that many punks now revere Saccharine Trust, it still feels like they somehow haven’t gotten their due. It was really inspiring and sometimes hilarious reading about how they formed and the ideas behind the songs, the evolution of the band and their disparate poetic, Dada, No Wave and be-bop based influences.

Punk is a visual and visceral culture, and this book does a great job of putting across the aesthetics, the sights, scents and ideas of the random assortment of people that were drawn to it. The flyers, the fanzines, the insane apartments that intentionally resembled surrealist hamster cages…They had shows in the infamous repurposed Church featured in Decline of Western Civilization I, a German themed village hall that sounded like a weird Euro-Tiki bar-like space complete with a rotten waterfall and ski lodge like ambiance, a repurposed theater which also had avant-garde dance classes. You get a sense of the danger from violent audience members imported from Orange County and aggressive anti-punk locals and of course, the cops, all of which is such a part of the narrative of Southern California punk. You also get a sense of the creativity and resourcefulness of the Pedro punkers in figuring out how to work around all that aggression and darkness and make a scene work.

This book is one of the best accounts of punk I have read, the interviews and excerpts are exhaustive and cover the nihilistic and constructive, the intoxicating and the mundane. Its somewhat homespun aesthetic is misleading; this book was masterfully edited by Craig Ibarra. So many perspectives and takes on different events weave together to create a powerful, emotional narrative, it was an unputdownable ride—I read this from cover to cover in a mad consuming frenzy, but had to leave the last few chapters, the ones about D. Boon’s death, to read when I was alone at home, as I knew it would be devastating. It was. Reader, I wept. Unlike most artifacts from the past where it seems like all the cool stuff happened without you, in some other untouchable dimension, A Wailing of a Town ultimately makes you want to create something new and worthy in your own town and scene.
—Layla Gibbon



Reissue of the Week: Conflict


September 24th, 2015 by

CONFLICT – “Last Hour” LP
If there were any justice in this world, punks would think Tucson, Arizona, not London, England, when they heard the name CONFLICT. The superior American band released a demo tape and a single LP in the early ’80s and the record gets the reissue treatment here, complete with a deluxe 40-page booklet. This is absolutely essential for all fans of classic USHC—think the thrash of early TSOL with intelligible MacKaye-esque vocals overtop, except now Ian’s called Karen and she’s a queer Japanese-American woman singing about things a hell of a lot more important and interesting than straightedge and post-adolescent disaffection. Not that there’s anything wrong with anthems about being merely out of step—some of the greatest punk songs ever written are about nothing more than that!—but at a time when being a hardcore band in the United States meant being anti-Reagan and anti-establishment seemingly by default, the political specificity of Karen’s vitriol must have been refreshing. She wrote lyrics about human trafficking, nuclear war, femicide, and her lived experiences as a psychiatric nurse, a woman, and a minority, always direct and never preachy. The flyer reproductions in the enclosed glossy booklet reveal that CONFLICT played with everybody who came through Tucson—BLACK FLAG, HÜSKER DÜ, DIE KREUZEN, DEAD KENNEDYS, MINOR THREAT, DOA, CRUCIFUCKS, MEAT PUPPETS, the GUN CLUB, and TOXIC REASONS, to name just a few. This group should be a household name like the rest of them, but as we all know, history is rarely just. Also reproduced are two interviews with the group from the archives of the greatest punk fanzine on the planet (ahem), one done in their heyday and the other ten years after their dissolution, conducted by the late great Lance Hahn. Comes with a lyric sheet and photo insert. Get it. (GA)

(Puke N Vomit)