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MRR Radio #1587 • 12/10/17

This week Matt pulls some rarities out of the vault to make the scums and punks drool. Intro song: STENGTE DØRER ...

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ATTENTAT!

MRR Radio #1586 • 12/3/17

On this week's MRR Radio, Rob goes ballistic for late '70s and early '80s Bloodstains punk rock from around the ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #416 • Jan 2018

Another new year, another exciting issue of Maximum Rocknroll! MRR #416, our January 2018 issue, begins with a sad note as we ...

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"Who gives a fuck?"

MRR Radio #1585 • 11/26/17

“[...] Elvis gives them a short speech about the death pangs that humanity must go through in order to reach ...

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MRR Radio #1584 • 11/19/17

Another fuct up Rotten Ron and Horrrible Halitosis Punker Power Hour. Intro song: DRUGCHARGE - Husk Rotten Ron fucks it up so you ...

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Create to Destroy! Rave Up Records


December 16th, 2015 by

CreateToDestroyLogo

I saw the Tampax “Suck My Cock/Snivell” 7″ for sale on Punk & Destroy’s website in Osaka. (I still have yet to see it in the USA minus Discourage Records.)  I then furiously got in touch with the label in Rome, Italy directly as there were only 445 copies or so pressed and I had to get my hands on one. After corresponding with Pier of Rave Up Records, I decided it would be interesting to interview him. He does a lot of releases of early punk rock, hardcore, and seventies glam rock mostly of reissues and unreleased material.  Here is Pier of Rave Up Records and Road to Ruins Festival. This is part of the Create to Destroy series.

What does Rave Up Records seek to release?
My mission is discovering the big music scene from the US underground between ’75-’81. Basically this is the “focus” of my job!

Are you a KBD maniac?
Yeah, my bigger music passion is US punk rock. Of course is not the only one, I’m huge fan of ’60s garage punk too. In 1986, at the age of 17, I started as a Back from the Grave collector, only in the mid-’90s I moved into obscure ’70s punk rock. Basically I love two chord rock ‘n’ roll, but I like also ’80s minimal synth, late ’60s early psychedelia and hard rock, Italian library music, Latin jazz, bossa nova, UK freak beat, kraut rock, glam rock, power pop, northern soul, ’70s funk…

What’s your personal record collection like?
I have over 7,000 records, but I’m not a collector. I use to sell my “jewels” in case they became too expensive. I think that it makes no sense to pay over one hundred dollars for one record! I prefer drinking wine, buying drugs, eating at restaurant, traveling than jerking off with records!

tampax

How’d you get in touch with Tampax?
I contacted Tampax in the mid ’90s. In that period with my band, Ufo Diktatorz, we played many of their songs. In December 1998, I managed their show in my hometown, Ascoli Piceno, in the local squat. It was funny, Tampax were dressed as a native tribe and performing a sort of dada-istic show without music. People was really angry, ’cause they thinking to see a punk show, not a “Lakota ritual pipe songs concert!!!!!!” Crazy night…. really dangerous for me! This is the spirit of Tampax, get it or leave it!

How’d you come up with the “cock” adaptor for the recent Tampax release? Do you think that was a little lewd? Was this your doing or Tampax?
The cock adapter was an idea of Ado, the lead singer. He said to me, “Pier, I don’t want to reissue our old material in a ‘normal’ way. I don’t care about a memorialistic release for your boring collectors friends! So, take this or fuck you!”

Have you done creative things like that with other records?
My other job is produce and write documentaries. As film director, I released many works on satellite television (FOX TV channel). The best ones are Crollo Nervoso (about new wave scene of the ’80s), Italo Disco (Italian disco of the ’80s), Mellotron (on Italian progressive rock of the ’70s). Right now I’m working of The Italian Job, about the Italian soundtracks of the sixties/seventies (such Piero Piccioni, Piero Umiliani, Ennio Morricone, Louis Bacalov and more).

My other regular activity is organizing Road to Ruins festival. It started as punk rock festival eight years ago. I managed great shows such Crime, Unnatural Axe, Sham 69, Eater, Dictators, Agent Orange, Kids, Angry Samoans, Cheetah Chrome, Fast Cars, Adolescents, Private Dicks, Subway Sect, Dennis Most and the Instigators, Chainsaw and many many more….right now, I changed the focus…. Road to Ruins is a rock movie festival! It was boring to organize shows, too much stress!

The last one is playing music… I started with Ufo Diktatorz in 1992, a punk band that used to play pure KBD punk rock (covers such “51%” by Defnics, “They Saved Hitler’s Brain” by Unnatural Axe and so on…). We were a bunch of chaotic and alcoholic weirdos. Every show was a small battle…. broken noses and provocation a go-go! After a tragic show near Roma, I decided to close the experience with Ufo Diktatorz and start with Transex. It was too dangerous to continue with UFO! The testament of this band are two seven inches. Transex released two albums and one 7″ of great midtempo punk rock. Check our albums somewhere! Recently, four years ago, the band Illuminati….a parodist catholic psychedelic band…. we done two albums, the first on Hit Bit and the second one on Misty Lane records, a fine Italian label of sixties stuff.

Are you just surrounded by aging punk legends living in Italy?
Ah, ah! nooooo!!!I know all the old punks of my country, but my daily friends are guys of the local r’n’r punk scene, such Giuda, Human Race, Alieni, Mega, Lexicon Devils, Holiday Inn, The Hand… Right now I’m goin’ to release some of these bands, they’re all great!

pier and cheetah chrome

Pier and Cheetah Chrome

How do you track down the record labels and bands that long ago became defunct?
Well, before internet was really hard. I had some friends who helped me for contact the bands (Benjahn Mirhadi, who died some years ago, Mario Panciera, Chuck Warner, Frank Manley, Dave Fergusson and others…) but I done 95% of the job myself. I used to phone in the night searching the contacts on the US telephone guide! I remember those days as pioneer-istic, totally different than right now. Finding contacts is really easy… All the social media sites are a great help for my mission!!

Do you release any current material or just reissues and obscurity?
I never released new bands, but some months ago I started to help some friends of mine. I will only produce some few stuff, only on 7″ format. Just for joke… my job is another! I have at least over 70 albums of old punk bands to release!

Synthetic Shadows Records?
As I wrote before, I also like ’80s post punk and electronic synth music. Synthetic Shadows is the sub label dedicated to this kind of stuff. I also have Backstreet Records, the label devoted to power pop, another style of music that I love a lot!

Rave Up books?
Well, right now I’m also an editor, with Rave Up books project. The first two books are dedicated to Italian punk scene of 1977-81 (Lo Stivale è marcio) and new wave 1981-85 (Noi conquisteremo la luna). I really hope to release both in English if I find someone interested. Let’s see!

The new book is dedicated to the Luther Blissett project, a movement of “agit prop” influenced by Situazionism, active in Roma between 1995-1999. During those years I studied at University, but I was also a radical activist into the squat movement. Funny period… lot of riots, fighting in the streets against cops and more.

Can you make me a mix tape?
Sure! 30% US punk, 20% US teenage Back from the Grave garage, 10% obscure Kraut rock, 10% UK sixties freak beat, 10% glam rock, 10% power pop and… 10% Italian library music!



Create to Destroy! Stuart Schrader


September 23rd, 2015 by

You may have heard the name Stuart Schrader before, as he did Game of the Arseholes zine. This was a highly respected zine in the “rawer” punk scene which you may have inferred from the title which references ANTI-CIMEX. He has done countless interviews, some of which have appeared in MRR such as MISSBRUKARNA and MELLAKKA. Oh, and don’t forget the ANTI-CIMEX archive! I am hoping for a re-issue of his zine, but for now here is an interview (by Amelia ANOK4U2):
How’d you discover punk?
First, thanks for the interview. I appreciate the Create to Destroy! feature because I think it is really important to recognize the blood, sweat, tears, and labor put into the punk scene that goes beyond just playing in bands. It would be incredible if we rewrote punk history not from the perspective of bands only but from a more holistic perspective of everyone who contributes, including those whose idea of “do it yourself” is to do nothing but just be a punk!

Anyway, I came to punk in a way that is almost unimaginable today: with great difficulty. I knew about punk years before I had ever heard it. I learned of the band names MINOR THREAT, BLACK FLAG, and DEAD KENNEDYS through mentions of them by guy named Glen Plake, who was an extreme skier with a giant mohawk who was semi-famous in the early 1990s. But it was before the internet and because I didn’t know any punks, I didn’t really know how to find the music. I discovered a DEAD KENNEDYS badge in a suburban CD shop, but they didn’t, as far as I could tell, have any of their CDs or cassettes. I was a pretty disaffected, angry, and lonely kid, and I was listening to mainstream metal and grunge at the time. Eventually, I met some punks, including one with whom I’m still friends: Nick Turner, who played guitar in COLD SWEAT and WALLS. He made some mixtapes for me, and it all began. Nowadays, one can use a search engine to discover so much, but it’s hard to imagine YouTube or downloaded mp3s being as precious to anyone today as those first mixtapes made by Nick and other friends were to me.

Yeah it used to be difficult to get into punk, I miss the hunt. Do you like ANTI-CIMEX?
I would say that I am obsessed with about three years of ANTI-CIMEX’s history. On most days, I think their second 7” is the finest hardcore record ever produced: just uncontrolled, sheer rage. I am also quite fond of their third 7”, as well as compilation and other tracks recorded circa 1983 and sung in Swedish. I do like their later output, but my life would not be diminished if I never heard it again. The 1983–1984 stuff, though, is essential.

On the Anti-Cimex Archive, I have collected a lot of information and ephemera about ANTI-CIMEX and SKITSLICKERS. I have tried to make the postings interesting and compendious, but it is difficult to be totally accurate, especially because there are lots of competing stories to be found and because I don’t speak Swedish. There is another cool blog in a similar spirit by a Swedish dude that fans should check called Victims of a Bombraid. Members of ANTI-CIMEX are on Facebook, and more ephemera is appearing online. Still, I am proud that I have put a lot of unique material online for free and easy access, stuff that is nearly impossible to find elsewhere. My favorite posts are one with complete info on the eight SKITSLICKERS sleeve variations and one on a few pre-CIMEX bands. I do have a lot more material that I would like to put online someday. It’s a slow process.

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Create to Destroy! Loud Punk


August 26th, 2015 by

I met Chris when I was with Perdition on a small Montreal/Albany tour in 2010.  I think that’s when I met Chris?  Anyway, he’s always been a go-to person in Albany and I wanted to find out more about his label and his recent Noise Annoys record store turned web shop.  Here is Chris from Loud Punk Records and Noise Annoys:

Are you from Albany?
Yes I’ve spent almost my entire life bouncing around the Albany area minus a small stint in Boston during 2000.

punk

What was the height of the scene there?
It really depends on how you look at. The late 90s was a really great time to grow up around here in the aspect of the punk scene.  It was a really crazy and exciting place during those days. All corners of the scene were really thriving, with shows all the time and a lot less internal divisions and inner scene politics. At the same time it was also a pretty intense and dangerous scene too. You typically couldn’t go to a show without at least a handful of brawls breaking out.But it too really depended on what shows you went to. It taught me a lot of life lessons at a young age, good and bad. The 2005/2006 years were also a really key time locally. The first part of the 2000’s were kind of bleak around here then. There was a resurgence, all of us that had been around for a bit weren’t kids anymore and started filling the shoes of guys like Nate from DEVOID OF FAITH/Gloom Records and others who were the real backbone of what went on around here but were not as active as they once were.  There was also a whole new wave of kids that started coming to shows. We had some amazing venues, great bands not only in the local scene but coming through town at the time. It made for a very fun and exciting environment.

What’s it like now?
Albany’s scene comes in waves, though things will be great for a few years, but quiet for a few. Currently it’s a little quiet but your hard pressed to find a scene not in a major city that isn’t in the same position that we are. While some come and go, the core group of dedicated folks around here are still doing what they know and love. Things can only get better and I have no doubt they will.

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Create to Destroy: Beau Patrick Coulon


August 19th, 2015 by

I met Beau Patrick Coulon in passing in many places over the years. He gets around the USA punk scene and documents it well by camera.  I feel like I run into him everywhere.  Since I keep seeing his photos published (even in MRR!) I thought I would interview him as to break a bit of the mystery of the man behind the lens:

Where are you from?
For better or worse I’ll always be from LA.

New Orleans 2015

New Orleans 2015

Why do you think it’s important that your roots are in the LA punk scene?
It shaped me as an individual early on. I was introduced to squatting and living outside the norms of regular society in the Hollywood punk scene. I don’t know what it was like in other cities but in my neighborhood during the late 80s/early 90s it was junkies, thieves, hookers, gangs, and the daily hustle of survival. 18th St was shooting it out with White Fence in the Yucca Corridor every single day. Gunshots on the hour almost. You had Hollywood Dogs, The Trolls, LA Death Squad, all kinds of skinheads, and oh yeah, Crips & Bloods. Everyone brought their beef to the Blvd. It was a tense time and being punk made you a target. It wasn’t something people got into lightly. There were automatic, often violent, repercussions.

BLAZING EYE @ Berserktown fest, LA 2014

BLAZING EYE @ Berserktown fest, LA 2014

What was your first punk show?
I’m not 100% sure. I remember seeing FEAR at the Hollywood Palladium when I was 14. Me and a bunch of other broke punks rushed the gates. About half of us got in. To be honest I remember the fights I saw at that show more than I remember the bands. In those days I was more into listening to tapes on my crackbox while getting wasted in the alley than watching shows. We had Green Hell Records up off the boulevard and that place ruled, I got some of my first punk tapes there.
What was the punk scene like coming up?
The “scene” I came up in, if you can call it that, was hostile. Most the punks I hung out with were pretty fucked up. If you had dreams or ideas beyond the next 40 oz you were chastised for “thinking you were better than everyone else.” Kids were quick to physical violence. You had to develop really thick skin or you wouldn’t make it. It was some toxic ass Darwinism type shit. Mostly we just panhandled, stole shit, turned tricks, whatever it took to get enough money so we could get trashed. There was some solidarity however. If you saw someone who appeared even remotely punk back then, it wasn’t even a question, you had to talk to them. Half out of curiosity, half out of the need for safety in numbers. A lot of people idealize this time period. I do not. There were fun moments for sure, but compared to my life today it was pretty awful.


Are you still connected to the LA scene?

Loosely. It’s different for me now. Most the punks I used to kick it with are either dead, locked up, or moved away. Headline Records on Melrose is probably the last punk hold out in Hollywood. But there’s always cool shit happening in LA. It’s one of the most creative places on the planet. Every time I’m there it seems like there’s some good backyard show, some new collective starting, or interesting project happening. As you know, the East 7th Street Punx do rad stuff. There’s Bridgetown DIY in La Peunte and VLHS in Pomona, both are all ages punk/DIY venues. Musica Para La Destrukcion in South Central makes killer shirts, pins, and tapes. And there are shitloads of excellent punk bands from all around the LA area: BLAZING EYE, GRIMA, DRAPETOMANIA, SADICOS, TOZCOS, AUSENCIA, RAYOS X, to list a few.

Where are you now?
New Orleans

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Create to Destroy! All Punks Go For It


August 12th, 2015 by

oof1

Gurpaul sings in this band from Fresno called MUTANT ITCH.  They play the Bay all the time and I almost feel like they are a local band here in Oakland.  I really respect what the punks in Fresno are doing from MUTANT ITCH to Dark Raids Records.  I thought I’d find out more about this fest and how it all happened.  Gurpaul is speaking on behalf of Screaming Vomit to answer my questions about this mysterious one-day punk bonanza occurring in Fresno on September 19th.  See you there, punks!

What is Screaming Vomit???
Two members of MUTANT ITCH that got sick of the lack of punks gigs here and starting booking some! Also a Screaming Vomit zine is in the works.

All punks go for what?
IT!!! TOM AND BOOT BOYS!!! and the punk explosion that’s gonna happen in Fresno that day. So… ALL PUNKS GO FOR IT!!!

Fresno?
That’s right! …The middle of California, A small city between the Bay Area and Los Angeles. If you’re looking to play a gig or make some extra gas money while on tour I suggest stopping here. Our punk scene is pretty small but we always try our hardest to do what we can for touring bands and make sure they have a good time.

I agree—go play Fresno, Fresno has a small but strong punk scene and is not a bad drive from other California tour cities. Where should we stay?
Well, if you don’t have a friend to stay with, get a hotel room with some friends. it can be pretty cheap. Other than that you’re screwed. Last thing you wanna do is roam the streets of Downtown Fresno late at night.

What’s the weather like?
Right now its extremely hot, but in September I don’t know what its gonna be like… the weather here is so unpredictable.

What should we bring?
Your ticket! and enough money to party and buy merch with.
….and of course money to get the hell out of Fresno!

Can we trash the venue or do we have to respect it?  Basically, can we set off explosives inside?
Definitely respect the space. Its very hard for us to book gigs right now due to lack of venues and this brewery was nice enough to allow this sort of event to happen and its locally owned, so I have mad respect for them. The plus side is the bands are all playing outside! Haha

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